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Cooking Up Science with Miss America: "Oooey Gooey Fun!"

making slime

VPM Classroom  |  Cooking Up Science with Miss America

Episode 2: Join biochemist and Miss America 2020, Camille Schrier, as she uses her kitchen as her laboratory. In this episode of Cooking Up Science with Miss America we will explore States of Matter. We know that substances can exist as different states of matter: solids, liquids, or gasses. But can some substances have the properties of more than one state of matter at the same time?  Let's explore some oooey gooey Non-Newtonian fluids by making oobleck and slime and discover the science behind them. Developed for students in grades 6-10.

Produced by Camille Schrier, Miss America 2020, in partnership with VPM.

More information related to States of Matter, Non-Newtonian fluids, Oobleck and Slime:

Virginia Standards of Learning: 

2.3 The student will investigate and understand that matter can exist in different phases. Key ideas include:
a) Matter has mass and takes up space.
b) Solids, liquids, and gases have different characteristics.
c) Heating and cooling can change the phases of matter.

3.3 The student will investigate and understand how materials interact with water. Key ideas include:
a) Solids and liquids mix with water in different ways.
b) Many solids dissolve more easily in hot water than in cold water.

5.3 The student will investigate and understand that there is a relationship between force and energy of moving objects. Key ideas include:
d) When objects collide, the contact forces transfer energy and can change an objects’ motion.

5.7 The student will investigate and understand that matter has properties and interactions. Key ideas include:
b) Substances can be mixed together without changes in their physical properties; and
c) energy has an effect on the phases of matter.

6.5 The student will investigate and understand that all matter is composed of atoms. Key ideas include:
a) Atoms consist of particles, including electrons, protons, and neutrons.
b) Atoms of a particular element are similar but differ from atoms of other elements.
c) Elements may be represented by chemical symbols.
d) Two or more atoms interact to form new substances, which are held together by electrical forces (bonds).
e) Compounds may be represented by chemical formulas.
f) Chemical equations can be used to model chemical changes.

PS.8 The student will investigate and understand that work, force, and motion are related. Key ideas include:
b) Motion is described by Newton’s laws.