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VPM Daily Newscast: October 14, 2021

VPM's daily newscast contains all your Central Virginia news in just 5 to 10 minutes. Episodes are recorded the night before so you can wake up prepared.           

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Here’s a recap of the top stories on the morning of Thursday, October 14, 2021: 

  • A new analysis shows underfunding leaves many Virginia students who speak English as a second language behind. And, as Whittney Evans reports, the problem is compounded by school closures during the pandemic. 

  • Henrico County supervisors have accepted plans to build a 17,000 seat arena and more than 200 residential units. The mix-use development, called GreenCity, will be over 200 acres and cost about $250 million to build. According to Richmond Bizsense, the arena and other initial pieces of the project are expected to be finished in 2025. The entire development is targeted to be completed by 2034. The developers of this project also worked on the failed Navy Hill proposal, which would have replaced the Richmond Coliseum.   

  • Heavy rain - or even flood warnings - don't always stop motorists from going through high water. As Jonah Grinkewitz from our partner station WHRV reports, that decision could come with a hefty price tag. 

  • Chesterfield County’s five magisterial districts are about to get slightly realigned. Officials say state law requires the Board of Supervisors to change the boundaries of the districts every 10 years based on Census data. Officials are holding Facebook live events to go over the process and to answer resident’s questions. A meeting was held last night -- with the next one scheduled for October 19 at 6 p.m. The redistricting does not change any school boundaries. A public hearing on the proposed changes will be held on October 27. More information, including a rendering of the proposed changes, can be found at Chesterfield.gov

  • Restaurante Week is going on through October 17 throughout the state. It’s part of the Virginia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s ongoing celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month. The campaign aims to highlight Hispanic-owned businesses, during a time when many have had to scale back operations. Due to COVID-19 concerns, the chamber of commerce also moved its annual Que Pasa Festival to an online format. Organizers told VPM they hope to have an in-person version of the festival next May.